FAQs About Tomorrow’s Video Projects Webinar

Tomorrow at 4pm Eastern Time I am hosting a webinar that is titled 5 Video Projects for Almost Every Classroom. As I write this, 25 people are registered and I’ve answered a bunch of questions from readers who are interested in registering. I recorded the following short video by using YouTube Live to answer those FAQs. The most frequently asked question is, “will it be recorded?” Yes, it will be recorded and the recording will be available to everyone who is registered whether you attend the live session or not.


FAQs About Tomorrow’s Video Projects Webinar syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

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See What Facebook (Thinks It) Knows About You

camera

Today offered a vivid reminder that social networks are (also) surveillance machines, as SnapChat published heatmap of students participating in National Walkout Day. And, in general, as we’ve come to know over the past two years, the information ecosystem created by social networks is pretty poisonous. Amy Collier reminds us today that even Pinterest can be a powerful vector for disinformation.

We’ve posted before about ways to understand better what’s going on with your social media accounts. For example, Lee highlighted a ProPublica report on just this topic a couple of years ago, and eight years ago Mark documented how to archive your Facebook data.

But this is an evergreen topic, and it’s back in the news thanks to a HackerNoon article by Georges Abi-Heila. Anyone can download their data (on a computer, not on mobile) in a pretty straightforward way. First, click on the little menu:

settings screenshot
 
 
 

Then, click on Settings:

 
 

menu screenshot

Then, at the bottom of the central panel, click “Download a copy of your Facebook data” (you’re not removing it–just getting a copy!):

DownloadDataScreenshot

It’ll make you log in, and then you wait a bit. It took the author of the article about 10 minutes to get the archive; it took me 22 minutes (yes, I timed it), even though my archive was smaller.

As Abi-Heila shows, Facebook does indeed have a record of everything you’ve done or clicked on its website since your account’s creation, including pointlessly detailed photo metadata and lots of information about every time you’ve accessed the site.

One of the most amusing parts of the datadump is discovering what advertisers have your contact information–some of mine I can only imagine have it because I made fun of them in a post somewhere. Anyway, it’s pretty interesting, and it’s human-readable (and certainly analyzable!) If you use Facebook, why not take a peek at what The Machine knows? In any case, Abi-Heila’s article is definitely worth a read!

Photo “camera | You’re being watched” by Flickr user Bill Smith / Creative Commons licensed BY-2.0

 

See What Facebook (Thinks It) Knows About You syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

FAQs About Tomorrow’s Video Projects Webinar

Tomorrow at 4pm Eastern Time I am hosting a webinar that is titled 5 Video Projects for Almost Every Classroom. As I write this, 25 people are registered and I’ve answered a bunch of questions from readers who are interested in registering. I recorded the following short video by using YouTube Live to answer those FAQs. The most frequently asked question is, “will it be recorded?” Yes, it will be recorded and the recording will be available to everyone who is registered whether you attend the live session or not.


FAQs About Tomorrow’s Video Projects Webinar syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Why I’ve Stopped Making My Public Google Docs Printable

In a word, theft.

In the last couple of weeks I’ve published a handful of charts that compare the features of popular ed tech resources. The most recent of those is this chart of 12 alternatives to Google Image search. I publish the charts in a Box.com widget that includes a download link. I also publish a link to view the Google Docs version of the charts. I don’t, however, allow printing or copying of the Google Docs versions of the charts that I publish. I used to allow that, but about two years ago I started to see my charts and other handouts getting redistributed without any attribution. And thanks to one loyal reader, I discovered a couple of my documents on Teachers Pay Teachers (a company that doesn’t seem to be the least bit concerned about copyright infringement as long as they keep getting their cut of your money). So now I only allow downloading my documents as PDFs through the Box.com widgets that I use in blog posts.

Using Box and allowing downloads through it doesn’t stop someone from using or redistributing my work without permission, but it does make it a little more difficult to do. Box also provides me with information about how many times my documents get downloaded which is something that Google Docs has never done.

I hate that I have had to take this approach. Unfortunately, until every teacher respects copyright or I just quit caring, this is the only way that I can feel comfortable publishing my charts and other handouts.

Finally, I realize that some schools block Box which is unfortunate because it is a great service operated by a publicly traded company. If you’re school is preventing you from downloading one of my documents, I recommend talking to your IT person about why they’re blocking it. Often, they don’t even know that they’re blocking it because they just apply broad filter settings that capture a lot of otherwise innocuous sites.

Why I’ve Stopped Making My Public Google Docs Printable syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Why I’ve Stopped Making My Public Google Docs Printable

In a word, theft.

In the last couple of weeks I’ve published a handful of charts that compare the features of popular ed tech resources. The most recent of those is this chart of 12 alternatives to Google Image search. I publish the charts in a Box.com widget that includes a download link. I also publish a link to view the Google Docs version of the charts. I don’t, however, allow printing or copying of the Google Docs versions of the charts that I publish. I used to allow that, but about two years ago I started to see my charts and other handouts getting redistributed without any attribution. And thanks to one loyal reader, I discovered a couple of my documents on Teachers Pay Teachers (a company that doesn’t seem to be the least bit concerned about copyright infringement as long as they keep getting their cut of your money). So now I only allow downloading my documents as PDFs through the Box.com widgets that I use in blog posts.

Using Box and allowing downloads through it doesn’t stop someone from using or redistributing my work without permission, but it does make it a little more difficult to do. Box also provides me with information about how many times my documents get downloaded which is something that Google Docs has never done.

I hate that I have had to take this approach. Unfortunately, until every teacher respects copyright or I just quit caring, this is the only way that I can feel comfortable publishing my charts and other handouts.

Finally, I realize that some schools block Box which is unfortunate because it is a great service operated by a publicly traded company. If you’re school is preventing you from downloading one of my documents, I recommend talking to your IT person about why they’re blocking it. Often, they don’t even know that they’re blocking it because they just apply broad filter settings that capture a lot of otherwise innocuous sites.

Why I’ve Stopped Making My Public Google Docs Printable syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Reviews | The PocketLab from Myriad Sensors: Science Labs that Fit in your Pocket

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Myriad Sensors offers a collection of 3 PocketLab sensors, all of which are designed for 4th – 12th grade science classrooms.  The PocketLab One is designed to be a basic starter solution (and would fit the needs of most science classes).  It can measure motion, acceleration, angular velocity, magnetic field, pressure, altitude, and temperature.  

The PocketLab Weather sensor is designed for weather measurements and can collect data on temperature, humidity, light, barometric pressure, altitude, heat index, and dew point.  Finally, the PocketLab Voyager (which I reviewed) does it all, and collect data on motion, light, magnetic fields, weather, and you can attach an external temperature probe.  Continue Reading the Review.

Reviews | The PocketLab from Myriad Sensors: Science Labs that Fit in your Pocket syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Reviews | The PocketLab from Myriad Sensors: Science Labs that Fit in your Pocket

Picture

Myriad Sensors offers a collection of 3 PocketLab sensors, all of which are designed for 4th – 12th grade science classrooms.  The PocketLab One is designed to be a basic starter solution (and would fit the needs of most science classes).  It can measure motion, acceleration, angular velocity, magnetic field, pressure, altitude, and temperature.  

The PocketLab Weather sensor is designed for weather measurements and can collect data on temperature, humidity, light, barometric pressure, altitude, heat index, and dew point.  Finally, the PocketLab Voyager (which I reviewed) does it all, and collect data on motion, light, magnetic fields, weather, and you can attach an external temperature probe.  Continue Reading the Review.

Reviews | The PocketLab from Myriad Sensors: Science Labs that Fit in your Pocket syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/