12 Alternatives to Google Image Search – Comparison Chart

Unless they’re introduced to other options, Google Images tends to be the default image search tool for students and adults. Google Images is convenient, but it’s not the best place for students to find images that are in the public domain or to images that have been labeled with a Creative Commons license. That’s why I made the following chart that features 12 alternatives to Google Image search. In the chart you’ll find links to each alternative and notes about considerations for classroom use. You can download the chart as a PDF through the Box.com widget that is embedded below.

https://app.box.com/embed/s/cgpbotpei42pwr7j52775oakmznboxbm

Click here if you cannot see the embedded chart.

I use the sources listed in the chart whenever I need a free image or video clip to use in a slideshow or video of my own. I’ll be sharing more about that in Thursday’s webinar, 5 Video Projects for Almost Every Classroom.

Photo by Arno Body on Unsplash.

12 Alternatives to Google Image Search – Comparison Chart syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Advertisements

Reflections on an Interest Mapping Exercise

Someone posting to the mapping board

This post is co-authored with Sherif Osman (@the_sosman),  CLT Senior Officer, Pedagogy and Assessment, Center for Learning and Teaching, American University in Cairo and Co-founder and Chief Learning Designer of ERGO Ed Design

According to Rockefeller Foundation’s useful guidebook “Gather: The Art and Science of Effective Convening”, you can design a more effective convening of people if you conduct some kind of “asset mapping” exercise at the beginning of the event. Asset mapping is described as an approach where “Participants from an existing community build mutual understanding of one another’s capabilities and needs to find ways to support one another” (p. 51).

We (Sherif and Maha) recently facilitated such a mapping exercise shortly after we had experienced something similar at another event. In this post, we share with you our context and thinking, and reflections on how it went. We conducted this mapping exercise as part of an event organized by our department, the Center for Learning and Teaching (CLT) at the American University in Cairo (AUC).

Our event included faculty, faculty developers and librarians from our own institution and a group from AMICAL institutions (AMICAL is a consortium of liberal arts institutions outside the US). Each day of the event was designed differently, with a symposium on the first day showcasing teaching innovation at AUC, a 15th anniversary celebration the second day including a student-faculty co-design session (which we’ll write about later) and booths showcasing the services CLT offers. The third day was dedicated to encouraging exchange of innovations across AMICAL institutions and promoting possible collaborations. To make the most of this third day, we thought that we would start facilitating some kind of mapping of interests from day 1.

We had also previously done some interest mapping based on participant applications, and we knew they were broadly interested in one of the following areas:

  1. Learning communities and Centers for Learning and Teaching

  2. Assessment

  3. Student Engagement

  4. Digital Pedagogy, Digital Literacies and Blended/Online Learning

  5. Digital Humanities

In our brainstorming, we thought that participants at our event would fall under one of three major roles in terms of what they would want to share about themselves:

  1. They were learners – they were novices, seeking to learn from others

  2. They were enablers – they had expertise, they were willing to share with others

  3. They were collaborators – they were seeking to work with someone else e.g. on co-teaching or on projects or such

Screenshot of mapping exercise cards

We therefore created several boards where participants could pin “cards” sharing details of what they were interested in learning about under the appropriate category – and we would later cluster these by topic under sub-categories. Participants would revisit this board at various times throughout the event and on the third day, after spending time with people of similar interests, developing ideas for projects and such, start posting “commitment cards” of what they planned to do beyond the event, which they also pitched to the group orally at the end of the last day.

After the event, we planned to digitize the cards and post them on a Padlet so people can return to them again.

We felt the exercise was overall quite successful, but that people needed some encouragement to get started. For example, the first card was posted by one of us, and we felt people were less willing to post “enabler” cards until we started posting some. We also felt that more time allocated for intentional mapping might have served well – what we ended up doing was visit people on their breakfast tables inviting them to participate, and reminding them once in the morning session and once before lunch break on the first day. Once the board started filling up, it took on a life of its own.

We felt that some people added commitment cards a little earlier than needed before having enough time to discuss things – and we think it might have been better to suggest people add commitment cards after they’ve had time to first focus on collaboration cards and teaming up with others.

Paul Prinsloo looking at mapping board

One other possible improvement would have been to digitize immediately as things were posted, so that people not in the room could engage, or even those present could engage outside the session times.

Two other suggestions we could have done would have been to allow some form of “like” or “follow” stickers to be place on ideas, even if someone was not going to engage with the particular project directly.  The other would have been to fold the card over at the bottom to make room for people to put their business cards in (especially for collaboration cards; although Maha says she never walks around with her business cards anymore).

Have you conducted a mapping exercise before? What was it like? Tell us in the comments!

Reflections on an Interest Mapping Exercise syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

12 Alternatives to Google Image Search – Comparison Chart

Unless they’re introduced to other options, Google Images tends to be the default image search tool for students and adults. Google Images is convenient, but it’s not the best place for students to find images that are in the public domain or to images that have been labeled with a Creative Commons license. That’s why I made the following chart that features 12 alternatives to Google Image search. In the chart you’ll find links to each alternative and notes about considerations for classroom use. You can download the chart as a PDF through the Box.com widget that is embedded below.

https://app.box.com/embed/s/cgpbotpei42pwr7j52775oakmznboxbm

Click here if you cannot see the embedded chart.

I use the sources listed in the chart whenever I need a free image or video clip to use in a slideshow or video of my own. I’ll be sharing more about that in Thursday’s webinar, 5 Video Projects for Almost Every Classroom.

Photo by Arno Body on Unsplash.

12 Alternatives to Google Image Search – Comparison Chart syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Reflections on an Interest Mapping Exercise

Someone posting to the mapping board

This post is co-authored with Sherif Osman (@the_sosman),  CLT Senior Officer, Pedagogy and Assessment, Center for Learning and Teaching, American University in Cairo and Co-founder and Chief Learning Designer of ERGO Ed Design

According to Rockefeller Foundation’s useful guidebook “Gather: The Art and Science of Effective Convening”, you can design a more effective convening of people if you conduct some kind of “asset mapping” exercise at the beginning of the event. Asset mapping is described as an approach where “Participants from an existing community build mutual understanding of one another’s capabilities and needs to find ways to support one another” (p. 51).

We (Sherif and Maha) recently facilitated such a mapping exercise shortly after we had experienced something similar at another event. In this post, we share with you our context and thinking, and reflections on how it went. We conducted this mapping exercise as part of an event organized by our department, the Center for Learning and Teaching (CLT) at the American University in Cairo (AUC).

Our event included faculty, faculty developers and librarians from our own institution and a group from AMICAL institutions (AMICAL is a consortium of liberal arts institutions outside the US). Each day of the event was designed differently, with a symposium on the first day showcasing teaching innovation at AUC, a 15th anniversary celebration the second day including a student-faculty co-design session (which we’ll write about later) and booths showcasing the services CLT offers. The third day was dedicated to encouraging exchange of innovations across AMICAL institutions and promoting possible collaborations. To make the most of this third day, we thought that we would start facilitating some kind of mapping of interests from day 1.

We had also previously done some interest mapping based on participant applications, and we knew they were broadly interested in one of the following areas:

  1. Learning communities and Centers for Learning and Teaching

  2. Assessment

  3. Student Engagement

  4. Digital Pedagogy, Digital Literacies and Blended/Online Learning

  5. Digital Humanities

In our brainstorming, we thought that participants at our event would fall under one of three major roles in terms of what they would want to share about themselves:

  1. They were learners – they were novices, seeking to learn from others

  2. They were enablers – they had expertise, they were willing to share with others

  3. They were collaborators – they were seeking to work with someone else e.g. on co-teaching or on projects or such

Screenshot of mapping exercise cards

We therefore created several boards where participants could pin “cards” sharing details of what they were interested in learning about under the appropriate category – and we would later cluster these by topic under sub-categories. Participants would revisit this board at various times throughout the event and on the third day, after spending time with people of similar interests, developing ideas for projects and such, start posting “commitment cards” of what they planned to do beyond the event, which they also pitched to the group orally at the end of the last day.

After the event, we planned to digitize the cards and post them on a Padlet so people can return to them again.

We felt the exercise was overall quite successful, but that people needed some encouragement to get started. For example, the first card was posted by one of us, and we felt people were less willing to post “enabler” cards until we started posting some. We also felt that more time allocated for intentional mapping might have served well – what we ended up doing was visit people on their breakfast tables inviting them to participate, and reminding them once in the morning session and once before lunch break on the first day. Once the board started filling up, it took on a life of its own.

We felt that some people added commitment cards a little earlier than needed before having enough time to discuss things – and we think it might have been better to suggest people add commitment cards after they’ve had time to first focus on collaboration cards and teaming up with others.

Paul Prinsloo looking at mapping board

One other possible improvement would have been to digitize immediately as things were posted, so that people not in the room could engage, or even those present could engage outside the session times.

Two other suggestions we could have done would have been to allow some form of “like” or “follow” stickers to be place on ideas, even if someone was not going to engage with the particular project directly.  The other would have been to fold the card over at the bottom to make room for people to put their business cards in (especially for collaboration cards; although Maha says she never walks around with her business cards anymore).

Have you conducted a mapping exercise before? What was it like? Tell us in the comments!

Reflections on an Interest Mapping Exercise syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Three Free iPad Apps for Creating Animated Movies

Last night I answered an email from a reader who was looking for a free alternative to Tellagami. Tellagami hasn’t been updated to work with iOS 11 so if you’ve updated your iPad, the app won’t work. Tellagami says that an update is coming, but I’m not holding my breath waiting for that. They said the same thing about the Android app and eventually just removed the Android app from Google Play. So if you’re looking for a free iPad app to use to create animated videos, try one of the following three options.

PuppetMaster is a free iPad app that kids can use to create animated movies. The app is designed for elementary school students and therefore doesn’t require students to create accounts in order to use it. All movies made with the PuppetMaster app are saved to the camera roll on a student’s iPad. To create an animated movie with PuppetMaster students simply open the app, select a character, and the select a background scene for their movies. PuppetMaster has pre-made characters and background scenes. Students can also add their own background scenes by taking a picture to use as the background.

Toontastic 3D a free app for Android and iOS. To make a video on Toontastic 3D students first select the type of story that they want to create. Their options are “short story” (a three part story), “classic” (a five part story), or “science report.” Once they have selected a story type they will be prompted to craft each part of their stories in order. A short description of what each part of the story should do is included before students start each section. Students can pick from a variety of story setting templates or they can create their own within Toontastic 3D. Once they have established a background setting students then select cartoon characters to use in their stories. Students can choose from a wide array of customizable cartoon characters or they can create their own from scratch. Once characters are placed into the story scenes students can begin recording themselves talking while moving the characters around in each scene. Students can swap characters between scenes, change the appearance of characters between scenes, and move characters from one scene to the next.

ChatterPix Kids is a free iPad app that students can use to turn pictures into talking pictures. To create a talking picture just snap a picture with your iPad or import a picture from your iPad’s camera roll. After taking the picture just draw in a face and tap the record button to make your picture talk. Your recording can be up to thirty seconds in length. Before publishing your talking picture you can add fun stickers, text, and frames to your picture. Finished Chatter Pix projects are saved to your camera roll and from there you can export it to a number of services including YouTube. ChatterPix Kids doesn’t require students to create an account in order to use the service. Using the app can be a great way to get students to bring simple stories to life.

On Thursday I will be sharing ideas and plans for using apps like these in your classroom. Join me at 4pm EDT on Thursday for 5 Video Projects for Almost Every Classroom. 

Three Free iPad Apps for Creating Animated Movies syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Three Free iPad Apps for Creating Animated Movies

Last night I answered an email from a reader who was looking for a free alternative to Tellagami. Tellagami hasn’t been updated to work with iOS 11 so if you’ve updated your iPad, the app won’t work. Tellagami says that an update is coming, but I’m not holding my breath waiting for that. They said the same thing about the Android app and eventually just removed the Android app from Google Play. So if you’re looking for a free iPad app to use to create animated videos, try one of the following three options.

PuppetMaster is a free iPad app that kids can use to create animated movies. The app is designed for elementary school students and therefore doesn’t require students to create accounts in order to use it. All movies made with the PuppetMaster app are saved to the camera roll on a student’s iPad. To create an animated movie with PuppetMaster students simply open the app, select a character, and the select a background scene for their movies. PuppetMaster has pre-made characters and background scenes. Students can also add their own background scenes by taking a picture to use as the background.

Toontastic 3D a free app for Android and iOS. To make a video on Toontastic 3D students first select the type of story that they want to create. Their options are “short story” (a three part story), “classic” (a five part story), or “science report.” Once they have selected a story type they will be prompted to craft each part of their stories in order. A short description of what each part of the story should do is included before students start each section. Students can pick from a variety of story setting templates or they can create their own within Toontastic 3D. Once they have established a background setting students then select cartoon characters to use in their stories. Students can choose from a wide array of customizable cartoon characters or they can create their own from scratch. Once characters are placed into the story scenes students can begin recording themselves talking while moving the characters around in each scene. Students can swap characters between scenes, change the appearance of characters between scenes, and move characters from one scene to the next.

ChatterPix Kids is a free iPad app that students can use to turn pictures into talking pictures. To create a talking picture just snap a picture with your iPad or import a picture from your iPad’s camera roll. After taking the picture just draw in a face and tap the record button to make your picture talk. Your recording can be up to thirty seconds in length. Before publishing your talking picture you can add fun stickers, text, and frames to your picture. Finished Chatter Pix projects are saved to your camera roll and from there you can export it to a number of services including YouTube. ChatterPix Kids doesn’t require students to create an account in order to use the service. Using the app can be a great way to get students to bring simple stories to life.

On Thursday I will be sharing ideas and plans for using apps like these in your classroom. Join me at 4pm EDT on Thursday for 5 Video Projects for Almost Every Classroom. 

Three Free iPad Apps for Creating Animated Movies syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/

Rethinking How Students With Dyslexia Are Taught To Read

Dyslexia is the most common learning disability, affecting tens of millions of people in the United States. But getting help for children who have it in public school can be a nightmare.

“They wouldn’t acknowledge that he had a problem,” says Christine Beattie about her son Neil. “They wouldn’t say the word ‘dyslexia.’ ”

Other parents, she says, in the Upper Arlington, Ohio, schools were having the same problem. The district in a suburb of Columbus wasn’t identifying their children’s dyslexia or giving them appropriate help.

So, in 2011, the parents pooled their resources and hired a lawyer.

“I was not surprised there was a group of students with dyslexia who were not getting the kind of instruction that they really needed,” says Kerry Agins, an Ohio special education attorney who represented the Upper Arlington parents. She says the issue of public schools failing to address the needs of students with dyslexia is widespread, in Ohio and across the country.

Agins advised the parents to file a group complaint against the district.

Parents typically fight special education cases alone, seeking remedies one by one. But a group complaint, Agins told them, could force the school system to make broader change.

Nineteen people signed the complaint, including parents, students and graduates of the Upper Arlington public schools.

In August 2011, the Ohio Department of Education found the Upper Arlington Schools in violation of the law when it came to promptly and properly identifying students with learning disabilities and finding them eligible for special education services.

“We felt vindicated,” Christine Beattie recalls. “Like, we aren’t crazy. We know what we’re talking about.”

In its decision, the state ordered the Upper Arlington Schools to train teachers and staff on how to identify and evaluate students with learning disabilities.

But the parents said this was more than a special ed problem. They say it was a problem with the way kids were being taught to read.

In response to a formal complaint filed by parents, children in Upper Arlington, Ohio, are now taught to read using a phonics-based approach. (Emily Hanford/APM)

How kids learn to read

The Upper Arlington Schools were using what’s referred to as a “whole language” approach to reading instruction. It’s an approach that became popular in the 1980s and continues to guide reading instruction in many public schools today.

Whole language holds that learning to read is a natural process. Children don’t need much direct instruction. Instead, surround them with books, and they will become readers.

But decades of research shows that reading is not a natural skill. Unlike speaking, which humans learn automatically by being surrounded with speech, we have to be taught to read.

People with dyslexia have an especially hard time learning to read because their brains are wired in a way that makes understanding the relationship between sounds and letters difficult.

Research shows that they learn to read better when they are explicitly taught the ways that sounds and letters correspond. And research shows that even students without dyslexia learn better this way.

Upper Arlington had to retrain its teachers, who had, for the most part, learned whole language-based methods in their teacher-preparation programs.

Now, students in Upper Arlington are taught to read using a phonics-based approach that explicitly and systematically teaches them how letters represent sounds to form words on the page.

“O Octopus ah!” the kids yell in a first- and second-grade classroom at Barrington Elementary School in Upper Arlington.

Their teacher, Ashley Stechschulte, is holding up a series of cards with words on them, and the children repeat after her as she sounds out the first letter sound.

Then they move to more complex letter-sound combinations. They discuss the word “sock.” Stechshulte asks what the letter combination “ck” is called.

“A digraph,” answers a student. A digraph is one sound created when two letters appear together.

Stechshulte then asks the class to consider the difference between the digraph “ck” and the digraph “wh,” as in the word “whistle.”

“Who can tell me what’s the big difference between these two digraphs?” Stechshulte asks.

A little hand shoots up. It’s a boy named Jacob.

“The ‘ck’ can only go at the end (of a word) and the ‘wh’ can only go at the beginning,” says Jacob.

The teacher was using “Fundations,” a program based on the Wilson Reading System, a structured, phonics-based approach. Fundations is typically used with children who are struggling to learn to read but it can also be used for whole class instruction.

For students in Upper Arlington who show signs of dyslexia on a screening test, there is more intensive, one-on-one tutoring available.

Brett Tingley, one of the Upper Arlington parents who signed the group complaint, says if all kids get effective reading instruction, fewer children should need special ed services.

“I have started to call it not dyslexia but ‘dysteachia,’” Tingley says. “It’s the teachers who are not giving the right kind of instruction.”

Emily Hanford is senior education correspondent for APM Reports.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Rethinking How Students With Dyslexia Are Taught To Read syndicated from https://buyessayscheapservice.wordpress.com/